The Employer’s Dilemma

So what does it really take to find the best employees?  My answer is usually focus, time and integrity.  Most employers don’t understand that the amount of effort that they put into even a brief interview is directly correlated to the results they get.  It’s an unconscious dilemma.

Focus.  Often times, employers have so much going on that they feel like they have to multi-task.  Some people are good at it, some, not-so-good.  Potential employees can smell your disorganization and your stress.  It doesnt necessarily want them to be part of an organization that cancels interviews or is too stressed to maintain focus on them for even 15 minutes.  Employees, like most humans want to be wanted.  Sure it’s their job to impress you too, but this is indeed a two way street.  Focus, please.  Focus on what you want to attract, focus on what kind of culture you want to continue to create and focus on the individual when they are in your office.

Time.  I know you’re busy and I know your team is busy.  Can you imagine how busy and stressed you will be when you are really scrambling to find the right person after you have to fire the first employee because you didn’t make the time to focus?  Taking the time to sit down with your team to understand what THEY want and need is key too, not just what you or your boss needs.  If they know that you are open to taking the time to chat with them, they will be more open with you.  If they know you value their opinion and you involve them in hiring decisions AND you add a team member that fits everyone’s needs- you look like a rockstar.  MAKE the time.  It will be worth every minute.

Integrity.  The word is at the core of our name because it’s a complex word. It presumes you conduct yourself in your personal and business life as someone with a true desire to adhere to moral and ethical principals.  People respect others that respect themselves.  Most employees can sense from a mile away if you are an ethical and moral person.  Talking with your potential employee about how they conduct themselves in certain situations is a great way to determine their “moral flexibility”…hopefully in the case of your ideal employee, there is no flexibility.  Share your experiences in this realm.  Share with the candidates who you are really looking for.  You don’t have to do it at first in the interview process, but not doing so will hurt your chances of finding a candidate that will fit with your culture.  Not showing your cards at all in the interview process is detrimental to you and your team.  Be open.  Address specifically what kind of person you are looking for and why.  Conduct yourself with integrity and probe to determine the integrity of the people you are talking with.  Watch body language carefully.  Are they shifting in their seat when you ask tough questions?  Is it possible that they just aren’t good in interviews?  It’s tough to tell.  The more comfortable you make the person feel the better answers you will get.

Focus.  Time.  Integrity.  All keys to your success in making sure you are hiring the right person at the right time.  An important aspect of these concepts is that you need to have all three cylinders firing at once.  Just having one or two of the three won’t do you any favors.  You must take the time, focus and conduct yourself with integrity – simultaneously.  The results will follow.

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